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Central to the mission of Saint Monica’s School Kangaroo Flat is an unequivocal commitment to fostering the dignity, self-esteem and integrity of children and young people and providing them with a safe, supportive and enriching environment to develop spiritually, physically, intellectually, emotionally and socially.

Reuben Johnson ( Principal) is the Child Safe Officer

At St Monica's part of our Child Protection & Safety policy includes:

PROTECT: Identifying and responding to abuse – Reporting obligations 

Introduction 

Protection for children and young people is based upon the belief that each person is made in the image and likeness of God and that the inherent dignity of all should be recognised and fostered. 
 
Catholic schools are entrusted with the holistic education of the child, in partnership with parents, guardians and caregivers, who are the primary educators of their children. Catholic school staff therefore have a duty of care to students to take reasonable care to avoid acts or omissions that they can reasonably foresee would be likely to result in harm or injury to the student, and to work for the positive wellbeing of the child. 
 
Under the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2009–2020, protecting children is everyone’s responsibility – parents, communities, governments and businesses all have a role to play. 
 
In Victoria, a joint protocol, Protect: Identifying and Responding to All Forms of Abuse in Victorian Schools, involving the Victorian Department of Education and Training (DET), the Catholic Education Commission of Victoria Ltd (CECV) and Independent Schools Victoria (ISV) exists to protect the safety and wellbeing of children and young people. 
 
 
All teachers, other school staff members, volunteers, contractors, other service providers, parish priests, and canonical and religious order administrators of Catholic schools within Victoria must understand and abide by the professional, moral and legal obligations to implement child protection and child safety policies, protocols and practices. 
 

Purpose 

 
Ministerial Order No. 870: Child Safe Standards – Managing the Risk of Child Abuse in Schools was made under the Education and Training Reform Act 2006 (Vic.) and sets out the specific actions that all Victorian schools must take to meet the requirements in the Child Safe Standards for registration. 
 
This policy is designed to enable Catholic schools to comply with Standard 5 of the Victorian Child Safe Standards: processes for responding to and reporting suspected child abuse, as well as the school-specific requirements for procedures for responding to allegations of suspected abuse in Ministerial Order No. 870. All procedures for reporting and responding to an incident of child abuse are designed and implemented by taking into account the diverse characteristics of school communities. 
 
Actions required under the relevant legislation and regulatory guidance when there is a reasonable belief that a child is in need of protection or a criminal offence has been committed are set out in this policy. It also provides guidance and procedures on how to make a report. 
 
This policy assists school staff (which includes volunteers, contractors, other service providers and religious leaders including clergy) to: 
  • identify the indicators of a child or young person who may be in need of protection 
  • understand how a ‘suspicion’ or ‘reasonable belief’ is formed 
  • where possible, refer to the principles of the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities as best practice in respecting and protecting the basic rights, freedoms and responsibilities of members of the school community 
  • make a report about a child or young person who may be in need of protection 
  • comply with obligations under the Victorian Reportable Conduct Scheme 
  • comply with mandatory reporting obligations under child protection law 
  • comply with legal obligations relating to criminal child abuse and grooming under criminal law. 

Legislative and Regulatory Requirements 

 
Schools must comply with the legal obligations that relate to managing the risk of child abuse under the Children, Youth and Families Act 2005 (Vic.), the Crimes Act 1958 (Vic.), the Child Wellbeing and Safety Act 2005 (Vic.), the Education and Training Reform Act 2006 (Vic.) and the Family Violence Protection Act 2008 (Vic.). 
 
The Child Wellbeing and Safety Act 2005 (Vic.) introduced the seven Victorian Child Safe Standards, which aim to create a culture where protecting children from abuse is part of everyday thinking and practice. The Child Safe Standards were introduced in response to recommendations made by the Betrayal of Trust report. 
 
Child protection reporting obligations for Catholic schools fall under five separate pieces of legislation with differing reporting requirements: 
  • the Children, Youth and Families Act 2005(Vic.) 
  • the Education and Training Reform Act 2006 (Vic.) 
  • the Crimes Act 1958 (Vic.) 
  • the Family Violence Protection Act 2008 (Vic.) 
  • the Wrongs Act 1958 (Vic.). 
These legislative obligations exist in addition to moral and duty of care obligations, which require school community members to protect any child under their care and supervision from foreseeable harm. 
 

Definitions and Obligations 

 

1. Types of Child Abuse and Indicators of Harm 

Child abuse can take many forms. The perpetrator may be a parent, carer, school staff member, volunteer, another adult or even another child. The nature of child abuse is complex. The abuse may occur over time and potential risk indicators are often difficult to detect. Therefore, the legal obligations for reporting allegations of child abuse can vary depending on the circumstances of the incident. 
 
Child abuse is defined in the Child Wellbeing and Safety Act 2005 (Vic.) to include: 
  • sexual offenses
  • grooming offences under section 49M(1) of the Crimes Act 1958 (Vic.) 
  • physical violence 
  • serious emotional or psychological harm 
  • serious neglect. 

Sexual offences A sexual offence occurs when a person involves a child in sexual activity, or deliberately puts the child in the presence of sexual behaviours that are exploitative or inappropriate to the child’s age and development. Sexual offences are governed by the Crimes Act 1958 (Vic.). Sexual abuse can involve a wide range of sexual activity and may include fondling, masturbation, oral sex, penetration, voyeurism and exhibitionism. It can also include exploitation through pornography or prostitution. 

Grooming Grooming refers to predatory conduct undertaken by an adult (18 years or over) to prepare a child for sexual activity at a later time. It is a sexual offence under section 49M of the Crimes Act 1958 (Vic.) carrying a maximum 10-year term of imprisonment. Under section 49M, the adult’s words or conduct must be intended to facilitate the child engaging or being involved in the commission of, or attempt to commit, a sexual offence by the adult or another adult. 
 
Physical violence Physical violence occurs when a child suffers or is likely to suffer significant harm from a non-accidental injury or injuries inflicted by another person. Physical violence can be inflicted in many ways including beating, shaking, burning or using weapons (such as belts and paddles). Physical harm may also be caused during student fights. 
 
Serious emotional or psychological harm  Serious emotional or psychological abuse may occur when a child is repeatedly rejected, isolated or frightened by threats or the witnessing of family violence. It also includes hostility, derogatory name-calling and put- downs, or persistent coldness from a person, to the extent where the behaviour of the child is disturbed or their emotional development is at serious risk of being impaired. Serious emotional or psychological harm could also result from conduct that exploits a child without necessarily being criminal, such as encouraging a child to engage in inappropriate or risky behaviours. 
 
Serious neglect Neglect includes a failure to provide a child with an adequate standard of 
nutrition, medical care, clothing, shelter or supervision. Significant neglect causes harm to a child that is more than trivial or temporary. Serious neglect is when the child is exposed to an extremely dangerous or life-threatening situation and there is a continued failure to provide a child with the basic necessities of life. 
 
Family violence Family violence is defined under the Family Violence Protection Act 2008 (Vic.) to include behaviour that causes a child to hear, witness or be exposed to the effects of family violence such as abusive, threatening, controlling or coercive behaviour. While family violence does not form part of the official definition of ‘child abuse’ in the Child Wellbeing and Safety Act 2005 (Vic.), the impact of family violence on a child can be a form of child abuse, for example, where it causes serious emotional or psychological harm to a child. A child can also be a direct victim of family violence. 
 
Child abuse can have a significant effect on a child’s physical, social, psychological or emotional health, development and wellbeing. The younger the child, the more vulnerable they are to abuse and the more serious the consequences are likely to be. 
 
There can be physical or behavioural indicators of child abuse and neglect, or a combination of both. While the presence of a single indicator, or even several indicators, does not necessarily prove that abuse or neglect has occurred, the repeated occurrence of either a physical or behavioural indicator, or the occurrence of several indicators together, should alert school staff to the possibility of child abuse or neglect. 
 
Child sexual abuse is more commonly perpetrated by someone who is known to and trusted by the child, and is also often someone highly trusted within their families, communities, schools and/or other institutions, such as the Church. 
For further definitions of all types of child abuse, a comprehensive list of the indicators of harm and advice on identifying perpetrators of child sexual abuse, refer to the protocol Protect: Identifying and Responding to All Forms of Abuse in Victorian Schools. 

RATIONALE:

All children have a right to feel safe and to be safe.  As teachers, we have a legal and moral responsibility to respond to serious incidences involving abuse and neglect of the children with whom we have contact, and to report instances that involve physical, emotional, psychological, sexual abuse or neglect.

RATIONALE:

All children have a right to feel safe and to be safe.  As teachers, we have a legal and moral responsibility to respond to serious incidences involving abuse and neglect of the children with whom we have contact, and to report instances that involve physical, emotional, psychological, sexual abuse or neglect.

RATIONALE:

All children have a right to feel safe and to be safe.  As teachers, we have a legal and moral responsibility to respond to serious incidences involving abuse and neglect of the children with whom we have contact, and to report instances that involve physical, emotional, psychological, sexual abuse or neglect.

RATIONALE:

All children have a right to feel safe and to be safe.  As teachers, we have a legal and moral responsibility to respond to serious incidences involving abuse and neglect of the children with whom we have contact, and to report instances that involve physical, emotional, psychological, sexual abuse or neglect.

Purpose

This Code of Conduct has a specific focus on safeguarding children and young people at St Monica’s against sexual, physical, psychological and emotional abuse or neglect. It is intended to complement other professional and/or occupational codes. 

All staff, volunteers, contractors, clergy and board/school council members at St Monica’s are expected to actively contribute to a school culture that respects the dignity of its members and affirms the Gospel values of love, care for others, compassion and justice.   They are required to observe child safe principles and expectations for appropriate behaviour towards and in the company of children. The following Code of Conduct provides guidance to our staff and volunteers in their role at St Monica’s Primary School, all of whom will receive training on the requirements of the Code. 

RATIONALE:

All children have a right to feel safe and to be safe.  As teachers, we have a legal and moral responsibility to respond to serious incidences involving abuse and neglect of the children with whom we have contact, and to report instances that involve physical, emotional, psychological, sexual abuse or neglect.

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The Sandhurst Catholic Education Office and Schools acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land on which their Offices and Schools are built. We commit to working in partnership with Aboriginal people for reconciliation and justice.

Believe !     Imagine !     Serve !
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